Here Are Your Candidates, New Hampshire

Gubernatorial Race

In September 2011, Governor Lynch announced he would not seek another term in office. He explained although “for me, being governor of the State of New Hampshire is the best job in the world [and] serving in this role is the highest privilege of my life, democracy demands periodic change. To refresh and revive itself, democracy needs new leaders and new ideas.”

Democratic:

Republican:

State Senate Races

Unsure of which district you reside in? Find it here.

District 1:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 2:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 3:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 4:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 5:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 6:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 7:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 8:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 9:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 10:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 11:
Democratic:

  • Fred Dyke (write-in)

GOP:

District 12:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 13:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 14:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 15:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 16:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 17:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 18:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 19:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 20:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 21:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 22:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 23:
Democratic:

GOP:

District 24:
Democratic:

GOP:

With the NH House having 400 members, I am not going to list the candidates here. To find who is running in your town, click here.

1st Congressional District:
Democratic Primary

Republican Primary

2nd Congressional District:
Democratic Primary

Republican Primary

Libertarian candidate

Independent candidate

Here are a few of the frequently asked questions from the NH Secretary of State website.

Where and when do I register to vote?

You may register to vote in the town or city clerk’s office in the town or city where you are domiciled up to 10 days before any election or scheduled meeting.

It may be easier for you to register with your community’s supervisors of the checklist. By law, they are required to meet on the Saturday 10 days prior to each election. Check the local newspaper(s) or call your clerk’s office for the date and time of such meeting.

Qualified individuals may also register to vote at the polling place on election day at all elections.

No matter when or where you register to vote, you will be required to fill out a standard voter registration form, and you will be asked to show proof of identity, age, citizenship, and domicile. These qualifications may be established by signing affidavit(s).

Can I register to vote on election day?

Yes, if you are eligible to vote.

Can I vote in a primary if I am an undeclared voter?

An undeclared voter may vote in a state primary or a presidential primary. You will be required to choose either a Republican or Democratic ballot when you go to vote.

How do I return to undeclared status after voting in a state primary or presidential primary?

When you vote on a party ballot in a state or presidential primary, you become a registered member of that party unless you fill out a card to return to undeclared status with the supervisors of the checklist.

You may check your party affiliation on-line at Voter Information Look-up.

During the 2012 legislative session the legislature passed House Bill 1354, also known as the “Voter ID” Law. The new law will phase-in a photo identification requirement over a period of time.

The following information can be found as a pdf on the Secretary of State webpage.

What type of photo ID will I need in order to vote?

For any election before September 1, 2013, you will be asked to provide one of the following:

  • Driver’s license issued by any state (even if expired);
  • ID card issued by NH Division of Motor Vehicles;
  • U.S. Armed Services ID card;
  • U.S. Passport (even if expired);
  • Valid photo ID card issued by either the federal government or a state, county or municipal government;
  • Valid student ID card;
  • Other photo ID deemed legitimate by the supervisors of the checklist, the moderator, or the clerk; or
  • Verification of identity by a supervisor of the checklist, or moderator or the clerk.

What if I do not have an approved photo ID?

Before November 1, 2012, any voter who does not present an approved photo ID will be informed of the new law and permitted to vote.

Between November 1, 2012 and September 1, 2013, any voter who does not present an approved photo ID will be permitted to vote after executing a “challenged voter affidavit.”

A voter who does not have an approved photo ID may obtain a free ID for voting purposes only by presenting a voucher from their town/city clerk or the Secretary of State to any NH DMV office that issues identification.

Is there any post-election action required by me after I vote without an approved photo ID?

After November 1, 2012, if you filled out a “challenged voter affidavit” in order to vote on Election Day, you will receive a verification letter from the Secretary of State, requesting confirmation that you voted in the election. If you do not respond in writing to the Secretary of State within 90 days of the date it was mailed, the Attorney General will conduct an investigation to determine whether fraudulent voting occurred.

So to summarize:

You do not need to show a photo ID in order to vote in the primary election on September 11, 2012.

You will need to show an approved photo ID to vote in the general election on November 6, 2012, OR you will have to fill out a “challenged voter affidavit” at your polling place.