NWLC gender analysis of U.S. Census poverty data

Today, NWLC released a detailed gender analysis of U.S. Census poverty, income, and health insurance data. Some highlights from the analysis, as well as blog posts and social media resources, are below.

This information and more is available at www.nwlc.org/povertydata.

 Poverty among Women and Families in 2013:

  • More than one in seven adult women (18 and older), nearly 18 million, lived in poverty.  The poverty rate among women was 14.5 percent in 2013, the same as 2012 and the highest rate in two decades.
  • The poverty rate for adult men in 2013, 11.0 percent, was also unchanged from 2012 and lower than for women.  Men’s poverty rate in 2013, although higher than it was before the start of the recession, was still lower than women’s record-low poverty rate (11.5 percent in 2000).
  • Poverty rates were particularly high for women who head families (39.6 percent), African American women (25.3 percent), Hispanic women (23.1 percent), and women 65 and older living alone (19.0 percent).  Poverty declined for Hispanic women between 2012 and 2013; among these groups, they were the only one to see a statistically significant change.
  • The poverty rate for women 65 and older increased to 11.6 percent in 2013 from 11.0 in 2012, a statistically significant change. More than two-thirds (68.1 percent) of elderly poor are women.
  • About one in five children (19.9 percent) lived in poverty in 2013, but this was a statistically significant decrease from 21.8 percent in 2012. More than half (58.8 percent) of poor children lived in female-headed families in 2013 – a statistically larger share than in 2012 (56.1 percent).

Wage Gap in 2013:

  • Women working full time, year round were paid only 78 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts, statistically unchanged from 2012.
  • Black women working full time, year round were typically paid only 64 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts, statistically unchanged from 2012.
  • Hispanic women working full time, year round were typically paid only 56 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts, statistically unchanged from 2012.

Health Insurance and Medicaid Coverage

  • In 2013, 17 percent of women ages 18-64 did not have health coverage of any kind, compared to 20 percent of men.
  • More women than men in this age group relied on Medicaid, with 14 percent of women in this age group having Medicaid coverage, compared to 10 percent of men.
  • Among the major sources of health insurance, women and men had coverage through employers or directly purchased their own coverage at roughly equal rates.
  • Approximately 60 percent of women and men had coverage through their employer; however, of those men, 75 percent had coverage through their own job (versus through a spouse’s employer), compared to 60 percent of women.
  • Nine percent of both sexes purchased coverage on the individual market.