Poll: Children’s issues should be high priority for next president

The Des Moines Register 

Only 35 percent of Iowa voters are confident that the life of their children’s generation will be better than their own, according to a poll released Thursday.

The poll also showed 77 percent of those polled believe children’s issues should be a high priority for the next president to address. The only issue in the poll voters said was more important was creating jobs and improving the economy.

Released by the Child and Family Policy Center and the Every Child Matters Education Fund and conducted by Selzer & Co., the poll is the latest effort by the two organizations to raise awareness about children’s issues in the upcoming presidential election.

“The strong interest in a positive agenda for policies affecting kids held true in our survey for voters across party, ideology, education level, income and age,” Brian Ahlberg, president of the ECMEF, stated in a news release.

Taking advantage of Iowa’s first-in-the-nation status in the presidential nomination process, the organizations hope the voter response revealed by the poll will compel candidates to prioritize these issues when campaigning throughout the state.

Rather than suggest the adoption of specific policy points, the two organizations hope to place pressure on each of the presidential candidates from both parties to release their own plans of action.

“Democratic and Republican voters both want candidates to spell out their agendas for children,” Charles Bruner, executive director of the Child and Family Policy Center, said in the release. “They may have different emphases on what is most important — but they both recognize roles for government in health, education, safety and security.”

The two organizations have sent campaigns both the results of the most recent poll, as well as an information booklet explaining the six most important issues pertaining to children. Organizational leaders have said they feel optimistic about the progress they’re already seeing.

Originally published July 30, 2015 The Des Moines Register (IA)