Questions for the Candidates

Ask the Candidates Where They Stand on America’s Kids

Make sure to ask the candidates where they stand when it comes to the well-being of our nation’s children. Too often the well-documented needs of children are crowded out of political debate and the budget process because of stronger competing interests. Be a voice for children. Ask candidates the tough questions.

Quick Tips on Raising Children’s Issues with Candidate

1. Find an event. Check out our calendar on our website http://www.everychildmatters.org/nh 

2. Bring some back-up. While one person can make a big impact at these events, it’s good to have some reinforcement. With more people there, the chances are greater that you’ll get your question(s) asked and even be able to follow up on each other’s questions. But spread out, because if you’ve been called on, it’s unlikely the person sitting next to you will be. 

3. Write your question in advance and practice asking them. 

4. Arrive early to get good seats or places to stand. Up front is always best. 

5. Get the speaker’s attention. If you can, make eye contact with the speaker or the person calling on the audience members for the speaker. Get your hand up first, fast, and high! Don’t wait for the second or third opportunity. 

6. Record! Make sure to get you and your back-up’s questions on record for full quote usage. Videos are great, but sound recordings work just as well. 

7. Get in the handshake line. This line represents yet another opportunity to ask your question. Don’t let go of the candidate’s hand until you have an answer. Use the handshake as a photo-op. 

8. Get quoted. Talk to the media and get them to cover your question(s) and the answer(s). Prepare your quote just as you prepared your question. Go to them; they generally won’t come to you. Keep them focused on what you want to talk about. 

9. Let us know what happened
! Make sure you let us know what you asked and what the candidate/officeholder answered. If you were interviewed by press, send us a link to coverage or let us know when it’s scheduled to appear.

 

Child Poverty and Opportunity:

In 2014, 34,000 New Hampshire children were living in poverty. The effects of growing up in poverty are dire. Cognitive and physical development can be delayed; social and emotional health can be impaired; behavioral problems can ensue and stay with children into adulthood. 

The opportunity gap is identified as the difference between the have and the have-nots. This gap affects a child’s ability to be successful later in life. 

What will you do to close the opportunity gap facing children so they have the ability to achieve the American Dream? 

Child Abuse and Neglect:

In 2013, 822 New Hampshire children were victims of child abuse and neglect. Child abuse and neglect costs America $124 billion a year and contributes to poverty, crime, and alcohol and drug abuse.

What will you do to ensure all children are safe in their homes and their communities? 

Child Care:

67% of New Hampshire children under the age of 6 have all parents in the workforce, and 71% of children from ages 6 to 12 have all parents in the workforce. 

What will you do to improve access and availability to quality and affordable child care opportunities for working families? 

Afterschool Programming:

35,302 children in New Hampshire participate in an afterschool program, yet 60,756 children would be enrolled in a program if one were available to them. We know the after-school hours are peak hours for kids to smoke, drink, do drugs and engage in sex; to become victims of crime; and to commit crime. 

What will you to do ensure children have access to safe, supervised afterschool opportunities? 

Health Care:

In 2014, 12,000 New Hampshire children were without health insurance, and in 2013, 85,055 children younger than 19 were enrolled in Medicaid. 

What will you do to ensure every child has access to the best available medical, mental health and dental care? 

Early Learning & Pre-K:

In 2013, 13,000 New Hampshire 3- and 4-year-olds did not attend prekindergarten. High-quality preschool increases a child’s chances of success in school and life. Children who attend are less likely to be held back a grade or need special education. 

What will you do to ensure that every child has access to high quality early learning opportunities? 

College Affordability:

74% of New Hampshire college graduates had an average student loan debt of $33,000, 2nd in the country. College is becoming increasingly unaffordable. 

What will you do to make a college education more affordable for those who want to attend?

1. Find an event. Check out our calendar on our website http://www.everychildmatters.org/nh 

2. Bring some back-up. While one person can make a big impact at these events, it’s good to have some reinforcement. With more people there, the chances are greater that you’ll get your question(s) asked and even be able to follow up on each other’s questions. But spread out, because if you’ve been called on, it’s unlikely the person sitting next to you will be. 

3. Write your question in advance and practice asking them. 

4. Arrive early to get good seats or places to stand. Up front is always best. 

5. Get the speaker’s attention. If you can, make eye contact with the speaker or the person calling on the audience members for the speaker. Get your hand up first, fast, and high! Don’t wait for the second or third opportunity. 

6. Record! Make sure to get you and your back-up’s questions on record for full quote usage. Videos are great, but sound recordings work just as well. 

7. Get in the handshake line. This line represents yet another opportunity to ask your question. Don’t let go of the candidate’s hand until you have an answer. Use the handshake as a photo-op. 

8. Get quoted. Talk to the media and get them to cover your question(s) and the answer(s). Prepare your quote just as you prepared your question. Go to them; they generally won’t come to you. Keep them focused on what you want to talk about. 

9. Let us know what happened! Make sure you let us know what you asked and what the candidate/officeholder answered. If you were interviewed by press, send us a link to coverage or let us know when it’s scheduled to appear.